Occasional Papers

The Center for International and Regional Studies publishes original research on a broad range of issues, including international relations, political science, economics, and Islamic studies, among others. Papers dealing with issues of relevance to the Persian Gulf and the Middle East region are preferred. We invite manuscript submissions for the CIRS Occasional Paper series throughout the year. CIRS Occasional Papers are registered under ISSN 2072-5957.

 

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CIRS Occasional Papers

Conservation in Qatar: Impacts of Increasing Industrialization

To cite this publication: Renee Richer, "Conservation in Qatar: Impacts of Increasing Industrialization," CIRS Occasional Paper no. 2 (Doha, Qatar: Center for International and Regional Studies, 2008, 2009).

Industrial development in the State of Qatar is taking place at an unprecedented rate. Such development is putting the environment at the risk, threatening ecosystem services and biological diversity. While Qatar is currently developing the legislation, regulatory bodies, and management agencies for successful ecosystem management and conservation efforts, the full implementation of these protective measures has yet to be achieved. This is in part due to a lack of scientific expertise and trained personnel as well as the early stage of environmental development in the country. While strides have been taken by the State of Qatar, the question remains whether they can be implemented in a timely fashion to ensure that current and future development projects support the country’s goal of sustainable development. 

Iraqi Refugees: Seeking Stability in Syria and Jordan

To cite this publication: Patricia Weiss Fagen, "Iraqi Refugees: Seeking Stability in Syria and Jordan," CIRS Occasional Paper no. 1 (Doha, Qatar: Center for International and Regional Studies, 2007, 2009).

Over two million Iraqis are refugees in the Middle East, living in difficult conditions, primarily in Jordan and Syria. Their unresolved plight and their still largely unmet needs constitute a humanitarian crisis. Their presence has had an impact on the two countries where they are concentrated and, by extension, on the region as a whole. Although long hosts to Palestinian refugees, the countries of the Arab Middle East have not been major refugee destinations in recent decades and this report raises questions about the limited regional response to a major refugee flow. At this point, most Iraqis and their hosts hope for a quick and peaceful end to the insecurity that has precipitated the flight, but events in Iraq raise serious doubts that their hopes will soon be fulfilled. Some Iraqis are hoping for resettlement in the United States and other countries of the west, a hope thus far available only to a very few. The report raises questions about the apparently limited ability of the US and other countries to mobilize a major resettlement effort similar to those that took place during the Cold War. More fundamental to the lives of the vast majority of the Iraqi refugees, it calls on the international community to launch a more robust humanitarian response that will assist and protect the Iraqi refugees while addressing the legitimate economic, political and security concerns of Jordan and Syria as hosts to such large numbers of refugees.